Author Archive

Job Hunting for the Public Healthist

June 28, 2010

I’m back in the midwest and hunting for public health employment after successfully completing my MPH in the pacific northwest. What do you guys think about professional development in this field? I know all of the conventional ways we hunt (networking, web searches, professional societies, etc), but how do we innovate?

More Data Regarding Teen Pregnancy Rates

February 1, 2010

This editorial in the New York Times discusses a recent study done by the Guttmacher Institute about how teenage pregnancy and abortion rates have increased recently (2005-2006) and suggests a possible correlation with the Bush administration’s abstinence-only education policies. The New York Times piece is pretty short, so give it a look-see.

The association is really only a suggestion, but it’s still exciting to have emerging information about reproductive health. Here’s the full report if you’re interested.

PLoS Research Awards

January 11, 2010

This post is like the Oscars of research. My nerdy excitement is through the roof! In the human category was a study about using Tetris to prevent post-traumatic stress disorder.

The post is amazing for several reasons. One, highlighting important research for the year gives you info on anything you may have missed. Secondly, they’ve also listed tons of other sites where people are talking about science. Third, PLoS One is an amazing concept. It’s a peer-reviewed open-source journal available for free to everyone. They’re making science and research information more accessible, which is really important.

Pink Glove Dance

January 11, 2010

I think we all can agree that this is amazing.

People FREAKING About Mammograms!

December 15, 2009

I like the way this New York Times article explains that there is such a thing as too much screening. A nugget:

Much of our discomfort with the panel’s findings stems from a basic intuition: since earlier and more frequent screening increases the likelihood of detecting a possibly fatal cancer, it is always desirable. But is this really so? Consider the technique mathematicians call a reductio ad absurdum, taking a statement to an extreme in order to refute it. Applying it to the contention that more screening is always better leads us to note that if screening catches the breast cancers of some asymptomatic women in their 40s, then it would also catch those of some asymptomatic women in their 30s. But why stop there? Why not monthly mammograms beginning at age 15?

Stick with him through the math, because he makes a good point. Basically, false positives can have a big effect on whether or not a screening program really works. I also like how he talks about survival measurements:

Another concern is measurement. Since we calculate the length of survival from the time of diagnosis, ever more sensitive screening starts the clock ticking sooner. As a result, survival times can appear to be longer even if the earlier diagnosis has no real effect on survival.

So… we need to consider some pretty nerdtastic factors when we’re talking about screening, including probabilities, sensitivity, specificity, and measurement. I GD love epidemiology!

UK Pilot Program Provides Over-The-Counter Oral Contraception

December 15, 2009

A pilot program to give teenage girls OTC birth control pills is being launched in London.

Pharmacists have been trained to do general checks and provide oral contraception in two inner-city London areas, both with high teenage pregnancy rates (one, Southwark, has twice the national average). I am sooooo interested to see the findings.

Apparently the UK government’s goal to reduce teenage pregnancy by 50% by 2010 is not even close to being reached. Thus the program. Of course opponents go with the old stand-by: promiscuity.

What are your thoughts? Possible increases in promiscuity? OTC birth control for teens a good idea? I’m personally pretty jazzed, but we’ll see how things proceed.

And Another Thing

December 1, 2009

Today is World AIDS Day. I hope everyone’s wearing red and considering the impact AIDS has had on the world. And figuring out ways to stop it.

Missin’ You

December 1, 2009

I realize it’s been ages since the last post. The end of the term will do that to ya. We’ll be back up and running in just a few days, but in the mean time check out this video. It’s a British anti-cocaine ad that is kinda funny, kinda scary, and kinda poignant. I personally think it seems like a fabulous way to reach out to people, but I don’t do cocaine so I have no idea if cocaine users would respond well to it.

Thoughts?

So Comprehensive Sex Ed Works

November 12, 2009

Something the public healthists have been saying for awhile now…

National Partnership for Women and Families has it here. The CDC issued a report that gave the findings of a panel of 15 experts who reviewed the results of a meta-analysis of studies on comprehensive sex education. Here’s what Women’s Health Policy Report said:

Sex education programs that advise students to delay sexual activity while also offering instruction on ways to avoid unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections effectively reduce risky sexual behavior, increase condom use and decrease spread of STIs, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-commissioned report released on Friday, the Washington Post reports. The report said there is insufficient evidence to determine whether programs that focus on abstinence until marriage reduce the chance adolescents will engage in risky sexual behavior, become pregnant or contract an STI.

Of course the abstinence-only supporters (becoming fewer and fewer by the day) tried to discredit it, but I think the proof is in the pudding.

I can’t find the original CDC report, does anyone have it?

I think it’s interesting as well that they couldn’t find sufficient evidence to make a determination on the effects of abstinence-only programs. I’ve read studies that say it may contribute to higher teen pregnancy rates. I don’t have links for that either, though, so don’t quote me in your final papers. 

Anyhoo, good news! This report comes on the heels of President Obama’s attempts to redirect federal funds to only cover sex ed programs that have scientific evidence to support their validity. Not internal/external, ya nerds, like their truthfulness. I like to think things like this mean some of us might actually find jobs when we’re done with school in June.

Keep in mind as well that comprehensive sex ed includes curriculum to prevent sexual initiation by promoting abstinence but also educating students about STI and pregnancy prevention.

Birth Control Through History

November 2, 2009

You have to check out this slideshow from Newsweek.com. It’s a look back at the history of birth control. Just a few minutes long and very informational. Plus it’s funny! They definitely use the word “womanizer”. Genius.